Five Reasons to Appeal a Denied Social Security Disability Claim

Posted on by in Social Security Disability

If your Social Security Disability claim is denied, you may feel hopeless and overwhelmed. A denial does not have to be the end of your case. There are many reasons you should appeal if your Social Security Disability claim is denied:

1. Most Social Security disability claims are initially denied. The best way to get a positive outcome in your case is to appeal, which is how most people finally succeed with their claims. Getting a denial can be upsetting, but once you understand that this is how the system works, you know that filing an appeal is simply the next step in the process. A denial is not the final answer in your case and you should not get caught up in the emotions you may experience from being told you are not disabled.

2. You have only 60 days to appeal your case from the date of denial. Filing an appeal gives you a second chance at a successful outcome in your case. Since the window is so small, it is wise to file an appeal as soon as possible, whether or not you are certain you want to proceed. Once the window closes, you cannot appeal and must refile your entire case and start over. Don’t miss out on your chance to get the outcome you deserve as quickly as possible.

3. A denial often occurs because there was not enough medical evidence presented in the initial claim. Your SSD attorney will review the denial with you and obtain the medical documentation that is needed. Once the information is added to your case, your appeal may succeed.

4. Statistics show that claimants who work with experienced attorneys and file appeals have a much higher success rate than those who do not. Because of this, you need to work with an attorney who is familiar with the system and can file your appeal immediately and move it along to a successful outcome.

5. You may win your appeal and be granted some benefits even if you are able to do some work. Don’t assume you won’t win because you have some abilities left. Your attorney can explain your rights and how your disability will be treated under the law.